Another Speedster SOLD: The EX-Tommy Hitchcock Jr. 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Roadster

Another Speedster SOLD: The EX-Tommy Hitchcock Jr. 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Roadster

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The 734 was really a special program where Packard built a small run of sporty “hopped up” cars that were unlike any other Packard ever created up until that point (and after, for that matter). It was Packards answer to the powerful cars being put out by their competition such as the Cadillac V-16, the Duesenberg J (SJ), the Marmon 16, the Stutz DV32, and others. Packard modified the standard eight chassis of 134 1/2 inches and dropped a DeLuxe eight motor in it with significant modifications. The cylinder block casting was completely different from the other 1930 Packard models in that the faces to which the intake and exhaust manifolds were bolted is on a 45 degree angle in a tent shaped protrusion from the block, allowing for more interior space and larger openings to the manifolds. The exhaust manifold itself was larger and was straight lined to the rear with fins cast on the top for cooling. Intake and exhaust valves were increased to 1 5/8 inches for better breathing as well. The carburetor is also unique to the 734 Speedster, a dual throat updraft Detroit Lubricator. A high compression 6.0 to 1 cylinder head could also be had on the 734. All of this combined boosted power significantly from the normal Deluxe eight cars. The 740 and 745 models made 106 horsepower at 3200 rpm, but the 734 with the high compression head along with all of its other modifications makes 145 horsepower at 3400 rpm! A high speed rear axle could also be ordered for higher top speeds. An estimated 140 734 Speedsters were produced in all body styles (Sedan, Phaeton, Victoria Coupe, Roadster and the Runabout) of which only around 25 remain in total extant today. The 734 Speedster bodies are also unique and completely different from all other Packard models. They are pretty much custom bodies made by Packard specially for the 734. A special length 46 inch hood, extra long cowl, extra long steering column and low body lines are features that only the Speedsters have. 

THIS AMAZING CAR, Packard number 184069 is one of just two Speedster Roadsters in existence today. With an unquestionable provenance back to day 1 and a beautiful restoration, I believe this to be one of the best examples of all the 734s that exist. Purchased new in 1930 at Packard Motor Car Company of New York City, its first owner was Tommy Hitchcock Jr., U.S. champion polo player, of Westbury, Long Island. He would own the car until his death in 1944 when he was killed piloting a P51 Mustang fighter plane. The car was then willed to his nephew Averell Clark who worked with Mr. Hitchcock at Lehman Brothers in New York City. Clark then sold the car to a coworker at Lehman brothers in 1947, a Mr. Kendrick Wilson Jr. of Bronxville, New York. He kept the car into the early 1950’s when he would eventually list it for sale in the New York Times as just a regular roadster for $475 dollars, not realizing the rarity and specialness of a 734 Speedster roadster. A fairly well known early collector Mr. Paul C. Walter of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania saw the ad in the New York Times and purchased the car from Mr. Wilson, knowing it was more than just a regular Packard roadster. Mr. Walter was nephew of Charles Schwab, founder of Bethlehem steel. It was then sold sometime in the late 1950’s to a gentleman in New Jersey. In 1973 the car was sold to its last and most recent owners, they would keep the car until our acquisition just recently. During their ownership, they commissioned Jim Cox of Pennsylvania to restore the car in the late 1990s.

TODAY, 184069 presents beautifully with a restoration that looks as though it was completed yesterday. The best part about this car is not the beautiful restoration, but the originality and completeness that so many of the existing Speedsters lack. It has all of its original parts with all the correct numbers as it left the factory in 1930. It has the correct chassis number(184071); special order number (SO51623), original body tag with the correct number (452-6), correct long steering column with correct steering column number (184065), correct front axle number (184061), correct rear axle (3:31 gear ratio) with the correct number (184066), correct engine and engine number (184079), correct original finned brake drums, correct finned exhaust manifold, original speedster intake, original special cast bronze dual throat updraft Detroit lubricator carburetor, correct four speed transmission, original and optional high compression cylinder head, and the body even retains all of its original wood. Included with the car are a couple very old registrations from some of its early owners solidifying its provenance, the oldest being from 1946 from Averell Clark and two from 1952 from Kendrick Wilson, one from New Jersey and one from New York as he must have moved during this time. A fantastic 734, possibly the best and 1 of only 2 734 roadsters in existence. 

SOLD!

If you would like to sell your car contact us today! We do it better than anyone else! 

   The 734 was really a special program where Packard built a small run of sporty “hopped up” cars that were unlike any other Packard ever created up until that point (and after, for that matter). It was Packards answer to the powerful cars being put out by their competition such as the Cadillac V-16, the Duesenberg J (SJ), the Marmon 16, the Stutz DV32, and others. Packard modified the standard eight chassis of 134 1/2 inches and dropped a DeLuxe eight motor in it with significant modifications. The cylinder block casting was completely different from the other 1930 Packard models in that the faces to which the intake and exhaust manifolds were bolted is on a 45 degree angle in a tent shaped protrusion from the block, allowing for more interior space and larger openings to the manifolds. The exhaust manifold itself was larger and was straight lined to the rear with fins cast on the top for cooling. Intake and exhaust valves were increased to 1 5/8 inches for better breathing as well. The carburetor is also unique to the 734 Speedster, a dual throat updraft Detroit Lubricator. A high compression 6.0 to 1 cylinder head could also be had on the 734. All of this combined boosted power significantly from the normal Deluxe eight cars. The 740 and 745 models made 106 horsepower at 3200 rpm, but the 734 with the high compression head along with all of its other modifications makes 145 horsepower at 3400 rpm! A high speed rear axle could also be ordered for higher top speeds. An estimated 140 734 Speedsters were produced in all body styles (Sedan, Phaeton, Victoria Coupe, Roadster and the Runabout) of which only around 25 remain in total extant today. The 734 Speedster bodies are also unique and completely different from all other Packard models. They are pretty much custom bodies made by Packard specially for the 734. A special length 46 inch hood, extra long cowl, extra long steering column and low body lines are features that only the Speedsters have. 

THIS AMAZING CAR, Packard number 184069 is one of just two Speedster Roadsters in existence today. With an unquestionable provenance back to day 1 and a beautiful restoration, I believe this to be one of the best examples of all the 734s that exist. Purchased new in 1930 at Packard Motor Car Company of New York City, its first owner was Tommy Hitchcock Jr., U.S. champion polo player, of Westbury, Long Island. He would own the car until his death in 1944 when he was killed piloting a P51 Mustang fighter plane. The car was then willed to his nephew Averell Clark who worked with Mr. Hitchcock at Lehman Brothers in New York City. Clark then sold the car to a coworker at Lehman brothers in 1947, a Mr. Kendrick Wilson Jr. of Bronxville, New York. He kept the car into the early 1950’s when he would eventually list it for sale in the New York Times as just a regular roadster for $475 dollars, not realizing the rarity and specialness of a 734 Speedster roadster. A fairly well known early collector Mr. Paul C. Walter of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania saw the ad in the New York Times and purchased the car from Mr. Wilson, knowing it was more than just a regular Packard roadster. Mr. Walter was nephew of Charles Schwab, founder of Bethlehem steel. It was then sold sometime in the late 1950’s to a gentleman in New Jersey. In 1973 the car was sold to its last and most recent owners, they would keep the car until our acquisition just recently. During their ownership, they commissioned Jim Cox of Pennsylvania to restore the car in the late 1990s.

TODAY, 184069 presents beautifully with a restoration that looks as though it was completed yesterday. The best part about this car is not the beautiful restoration, but the originality and completeness that so many of the existing Speedsters lack. It has all of its original parts with all the correct numbers as it left the factory in 1930. It has the correct chassis number(184071); special order number (SO51623), original body tag with the correct number (452-6), correct long steering column with correct steering column number (184065), correct front axle number (184061), correct rear axle (3:31 gear ratio) with the correct number (184066), correct engine and engine number (184079), correct original finned brake drums, correct finned exhaust manifold, original speedster intake, original special cast bronze dual throat updraft Detroit lubricator carburetor, correct four speed transmission, original and optional high compression cylinder head, and the body even retains all of its original wood. Included with the car are a couple very old registrations from some of its early owners solidifying its provenance, the oldest being from 1946 from Averell Clark and two from 1952 from Kendrick Wilson, one from New Jersey and one from New York as he must have moved during this time. A fantastic 734, possibly the best and 1 of only 2 734 roadsters in existence. 

SOLD!

If you would like to sell your car contact us today! We do it better than anyone else! 

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