1926 Franklin 11-A 4 Passenger Victoria

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  • Description

119" Wheelbase     6- Cylinder, 200 cid, air cooled engine     3-Speed Transmission     2-Wheel Mechanical Brakes

Chassis No. 163567-16     Engine No. E111781

     Two things had characterized Franklin automobiles since the first car was sold in June 1902: The engines were air-cooled and the appearance was unconventional. The air-cooling system would remain constant but by the mid-20's the quirky styling annoyed Franklin dealers to the point that Ralph Hamlin, Franklin distributor for southern California since 1905, lead a dealer delegation to Syracuse demanding a more conventional design. Much to the dismay of Chief Engineer John Wilkinson, who promptly quit, Herbert Franklin chose the talented designer J. Frank de Causse to formulate a new design. The new Series 11-A debuted in March 1925. Production of the Series 11A was 8,595 cars for 1925 and 7,606 in 1926. Franklin automobiles were always built as high quality cars. The price of the 1926 Franklin Victoria was $2,700 when a new Ford Coupe cost $485; a 1926 Chevrolet Coupe $645. Franklin automobiles were at the forefront of automotive engineering. The downdraft cooling system forced air down and around each cast iron cylinder with its phosphor bronze cooling fins. Liberal use of aluminum throughout the engine and body made Franklin, at one point, the largest corporate user of aluminum in the world. They were also one of the earliest users of aluminum pistons, Duralumin connecting rods, and case hardened crankshafts. Frames, through 1928, were made of fine grained ash that was very strong and flexible. Also significant was the use of full ellipctic springs, front and rear, providing a smoother ride than most of the cars of the era.

     This Victoria Coupe was built toward the end of 11-! production. The interior seating arrangement is unique to this body style, with a permanent driver's seat, the primary passenger seat for two at the rear of the compartment and a folding occasional seat at the right front. Another interesting feature is the Masco Car Heater, a manifold mounted hot-air heater with an outlet in the firewall on the right side, controlled by a sliding door.

     The owner of over 15 years informs us that this Franklin spent several decades in Oklahoma in the hands of well known H.H. Franklin Club member David Bailey. It is thought that Mr. Bailey purchased the car in the Washington DC area where it was found in a building being demolished for the construction of the Washington Beltway. Included with the car are registration papers from 1962 and 1962 to William Lloyd Mackey of Washington DC. The major restoration work is thought to date from the 1960's Since that time this fine 11A has participated in several Franklin Treks, both East Coast and West Coast. Recent maintenance has included: Generator rebuild, electric fuel pump for backup, overhaul of vacuum tank, and cleaning out and sealing the fuel tank. Cosmetically, the car is beautiful and ready to be in a collection or driven. Contact us today for more information!

 

Asking: $23,500